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AP Syllabus

AP World History 2014-2015

 

          

 

The Advanced Placement World History curriculum provides rigor, relevance, and structured academic writing.  Increasing student achievement in Writing is a key to making AYP, Adequate Yearly Progress. The AP World History course offers all students, especially motivated students, the opportunity to immerse themselves through writing and reading in the processes that, over time, will result in students developing proficiency in critical analytical skills in crafting historical arguments form historical evidence, reasoning, comparison, interpretation, and synthesis.

 

Advanced Placement World History is a challenging three term course that is structured around the investigation of selected themes woven into key concepts covering distinct chronological periods. AP World History is equivalent to an introductory college survey course. The course has a three-fold purpose. First, it is designed to prepare students for successful placement into higher-level college and university history courses. Second, it is designed to develop skills of analysis and thinking in order to prepare students for success in the twenty-first century. Finally, it is the intent of this class to make the learning of world history an enjoyable experience. Students will be able to show their mastery of the course goals by taking part in the College Board AP World History Exam on May 15, 2014.

 

Advanced Placement World History is structured around the investigation of five themes woven into 19 key concepts covering six distinct chronological periods. History is a sophisticated quest for meaning about the past, beyond the effort to collect and memorize information. This course will continue to deal with the facts—names, chronology, events, and the like but it will also emphasize historical analysis.

 

This will be accomplished by focusing on four historical thinking skills:

  1. Crafting Historical Arguments from Historical Evidence

 

Historical Argumentation

Appropriate use of relevant historical evidence

  1. Chronological Reasoning

Historical causation

Patterns of continuity and change over time

Periodization

 

  1. Comparison and Contextualization

Comparison

Contextualization

 

  1. Historical Interpretation and Synthesis

Interpretation

Synthesis

 

 

The five AP World History Themes that connect the key concepts throughout the course and serve as the foundation for student reading, writing, and presentation requirements are as follows:

 

Theme 1: Interaction Between Humans and the Environment: Demography and disease, Migration, Patterns of settlement, Technology

 

Theme 2: Development and Interaction of Cultures: Religions, Belief systems, philosophies, and ideologies, Science and technology, The arts and architecture

 

Theme 3: State-building, Expansion, and Conflict: Political structures and forms of governance, Empires, Nations and nationalism, Revolts and revolutions, Regional, Trans-regional, and global structures and organizations

 

Theme 4: Creation, Expansion, and Interaction of Economic Systems: Agricultural and pastoral production, Trade and commerce, Labor systems, Industrialization, Capitalism and Socialism

 

Theme 5: Development and Transformation of Social Structures: Gender roles and relations, Family and kinship, Racial and ethnic constructions, Social and economic classes

 

The 19 key concepts covering six distinct chronological periods

 

Unit 1: Technological and Environmental Transformations, to c. 600 B.C.E.

  • Key Concept 1.1: Big Geography and the Peopling of the Earth
  1. Paleolithic migrations lead to the spread of technology and culture

 

  • Key Concept 1.2: The Neolithic Revolution and Early Agricultural Societies
  1. Neolithic Revolution leads to new and more complex economic and social systems
  2. Agricultural and pastoralism begins to transform human society

 

  • Key Concept 1.3: The Development and Interactions of Early Agricultural, Pastoral, and Urban Societies
  1. Location of early foundational civilizations
  2. State development and expansion
  3. Cultural development in the early civilizations

 

Unit 2: Organization and Reorganization of Human Societies, c. 600 B.C.E. to c. 600 C.E.

  • Key Concept 2.1: The Development and Codification of Religious and Cultural Traditions
  1. Codifications and further developments of existing religious traditions
  2. Emergence, diffusion, and adaptation of new religious and cultural traditions
  3. Belief systems affect gender roles
  4. Other religious and cultural traditions continue
  5. Artistic expressions show distinctive cultural developments

 

  • Key Concept 2.2: The Development of States and Empires
  1. Imperial societies grow dramatically
  2. Techniques of imperial administration
  3. Social and economic dimensions of imperial societies
  4. Decline, collapse, and transformation of empires (Rome, Han, Maurya)

 

  • Key Concept 2.3: Emergence of Trans-regional Networks of Communication and Exchange
  1. The geography of trans-regional networks, communication and exchange networks
  2. Technologies of long-distance communication and exchange
  3. Consequences of long-distance trade

 

Unit 3: Regional and Trans-regional Interactions, c. 600 C.E. to c. 1450

  • Key Concept 3.1: Expansion and Intensification of Communication and Exchange Networks
  1. Improved transportation technologies and commercial practices and their influence on networks
  2. Linguistic and environmental contexts for the movement of peoples
  3. Cross-cultural exchanges fostered by networks of trade and communication
  4. Continued diffusion of crops and pathogens throughout the Eastern Hemisphere

 

  • Key Concept 3.2: Continuity and Innovation in State Forms and Their Interactions
  1. Empires collapse and were reconstituted
  2. Greater inter-regional contacts and conflict encourages technology and cultural transfer

 

  • Key Concept 3.3: Increased Economic Productive Capacity and Its Consequences
  1. Increasing productive capacity in agriculture and industry
  2. Changes in urban demography
  3. Changes and continuities in labor systems and social structures

 

Unit 4: Global Interactions, c. 1450 to c. 1750

  • Key Concept 4.1: Globalizing Networks of Communication and Exchange
  1. Intensification of regional trade networks (Mediterranean, trans-Saharan, overland Eurasian, and Siberian trade routes)
  2. Trans-oceanic maritime reconnaissance
  3. New maritime commercial patterns
  4. Technological developments enabling trans-oceanic trade
  5. Environmental exchange and demographic trends: Columbian Exchange
  6. Spread and reform of religion
  7. Global and regional networks and the development of new forms of art and expression

 

  • Key Concept 4.2: New Forms of Social Organization and Modes of Production
  1. Labor systems and their transformations
  2. Changes and continuities in social hierarchies and identities

 

  • Key Concept 4.3: State Consolidation and Imperial Expansion
  1. Techniques of state consolidation
  2. Imperial expansion
  3. Competition and conflict among and within States

 

 

 

Unit 5: Industrialization and Global Integration, c. 1750 to c. 1900

  • Key Concept 5.1: Industrialization and Global Capitalism
  1. Industrialization
  2. New patterns of global trade and production
  3. Transformation of capital and finance
  4. Revolutions in transportation and communication: Railroads, steamships, canals, telegraph
  5. Reactions to the spread of global capitalism
  6. Social transformations in industrialized societies

 

  • Key Concept 5.2: Imperialism and Nation-State Formation
  1. Imperialism and colonialism of trans-oceanic empires by industrializing powers
  2. State formation and territorial expansion and contraction
  3. Ideologies and imperialism

 

  • Key Concept 5.3: Nationalism, Revolution, and Reform
  1. The rise and diffusion of Enlightenment thought
  2. 18th century peoples develop a sense of commonality
  3. Spread of Enlightenment ideas propels reformist and revolutionary movements
  4. Enlightenment ideas spark new transnational ideologies and solidarities

 

  • Key Concept 5.4: Global Migration
  1. Demography and urbanization
  2. Migration and its motives
  3. Consequences of and reactions to migration

 

Unit 6: Accelerating Global Change and Realignments, c. 1900 to Present

  • Key Concept 6.1: Science and the Environment
  1. Rapid advances in science spread assisted by new technology
  2. Humans change their relationship with the environment
  3. Disease, scientific innovations, and conflict led to demographic shifts

 

  • Key Concept 6.2: Global Conflicts and Their Consequences
  1. Europe’s domination gives way to new forms of political organization
  2. Emerging ideologies of anti-imperialism contribute to dissolution of empires
  3. Political changes accompanied by demographic and social consequences
  4. Military conflicts escalate
  5. Individual and groups oppose, as well as, intensify the conflict

 

  • Key Concept 6.3: New Conceptualizations of Global Economy, Society, and Culture
  1. States, communities and individuals become increasingly interdependent
  2. People conceptualize society and culture in new ways
  3. Popular and consumer culture become global

 

Course Requirements/Expectation
·Actively participate in class and complete all assignments thoroughly.
·Attend class daily, arriving on time.
·Make up work when absent--contact instructor and send assignments electronically if possible; make prior arrangements for planned absences; 2 days allotted for each day absent to turn in work.
·Keep a well-organized and complete notebook for the entire year; students are expected to complete:
oweekly writing assignments which include DBQ, comparison, and change & continuity over time essays
ochapter quizzes (usually multiple choice)
ounit tests (see units below)
oprimary & secondary source analysis
ostudent-led class discussions
oweekly chapter outlines
·All students enrolled in AP World History course will take the exam on May 13, 2014.

 

Class Organization-AP World History is the equivalent of a college-level survey course in world history. Like college students, you are expected to read the assigned pages in the textbook and take notes on lectures and discussions provided by the teacher. In designing this course, the College Board aimed to help you gain the higher-order thinking skills you will need to be successful in college. For example, we will analyze primary sources in both texts and visuals. This primary source analysis will help you directly with the tasks required for the Document-Based Question (DBQ) essay on the exam, but the use of historical materials also will help you practice using evidence to make plausible arguments. You also will become an expert at identifying point of view, context, and bias in these sources.

 

A second important habit of mind you will develop over the year is assessing issues of change and continuity over time, including the capacity to deal with change as a process and with questions of causation. This skill will be especially useful for writing the Change Over Time essay on the AP World History Exam and often is a major focus in upper-level college courses in the social sciences as well as in the discipline of science. We will conduct whole-class discussions where you will explore diversity of interpretations that historians present in your textbook and in other secondary sources that I provide. We also will do simulations and debates that challenge you to address questions about human commonalities and differences and the historical context of culturally diverse ideas and values.

 
Tests - Tests will be a combination of objective (multiple choice), and subjective (Essay) DBQ (document-based questions), COMP (comparative), CCOT (change and continuity over time), essay questions, or document based questions.  All tests will attempt to recreate the testing environment of the Advanced Placement World History Examination.  Consequently, multiple-choice tests and quizzes will resemble an actual AP exam to the fullest extent possible.  All multiple-choice tests will be graded in a manner similar to the method employed by the College Board.  In addition, all tests will be timed in accordance with actual AP testing procedures.

 

Grading - All assignments will receive a grade.  Your grade will consist of an accumulation of points. Each assignment, assessment or activity will have a predetermined amount of points. Obviously the more comprehensive the item, the more points associated with it. Students will be told how many points each item is worth ahead of time.

 

A=90-100%    B=80-89%       C=70-79%       D=60-69%      F=59 and below%

 
Rules -This class will simulate a college course.  Therefore you must, be on time and attend regularly.  You must be prepared and participate in class.  Please respect others opinions (remember history is all about the validation of arguments through the use of documentation.  Just because someone has a different opinion than you based on the facts presented, does not indicate that they or you are wrong.
 
Text- Stearns, Peter N., et al. World Civilizations: The Global Experience, 5th edition.  New York: Longman Publishing Group, 2007.  Textbook support can be found at http://www.phschool.com/access/stearns_world_civilizations.html . The website can also be found on the back cover of the book.
Text- Bentley, Jerry, and Herbert Ziegler. Traditions and Encounters: A Global Perspective on the Past, 5th edition.  New York: The McGraw-Hill Companies, 2011.  Textbook support can be found at http://www.mcgrawhillconnect.com/advplac.html.  The website can also be found on the back cover of the book.

 

**REQUIRED READING**

Guns, Germs, & Steel by Jared Diamond

Great book! “‘Guns, Germs and Steel lay a foundation for understanding human history

 

Supplementary Reading

Conquest in Paradise by Kirkpatrick Sale

Dispels the myths surrounding the journey of Christopher Columbus, with new translations of historical documents that reveal the European motivations for exploration

 

The Colombian Exchange by Alfred W. Crosby, Jr.

The impact of Columbus' voyages on the global ecosystem is examined.

 

When China Ruled the Seas by Louise Levathes

An interesting account of Zheng He's sea voyages to the Indian Ocean--just before Europeans round the tip of Africa

 

The Adventures of Ibn Battuta by Ross Dunn

Ibn Battuta logged over 70,000 miles, some of it through dangerous regions, and as far as from Morocco to China and back. It offers very interesting insights into the Muslim world of the 14th century.

 

Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed by Jared Diamond

A follow up to Guns, Germs, & Steel that looks what has caused great civilizations to fall throughout history.

 

Supplementary Reading Critical Analysis Assignment

 

In total over this summer, you must have to have read three books.  A typed book report for each book read will be due on the FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL. Each report is to include a critical analysis using the following paragraph instruction below:

 

Paragraph one: an identification of the main characters and their importance to the story line

Paragraph two: a summary of the book that includes the description of the geographic location and historical time period involved

Paragraph three: an identification of the problem or situation presented in the book

Paragraph four: a description of three new things you learned about the country's culture from the book

Paragraph five: an explanation of how this book can be a learning tool for Advanced Placement World History

Course Outline

6.5 Days: Unit 1: Technological and Environmental Transformations, to c. 600 B.C.E., Chapters 1–5

 

Locating World History       pp. xvi–xxi

Environment            pp. 12–14

Time        pp. 4–5

Diverse interpretations            p. xxix

 

Developing agriculture and technology              pp. 2–31

Types of early societies           pp. 2–15

Emergence of agriculture and technology                pp. 10–31

Nature of village settlements   pp. 10–31

Impact of agriculture               pp. 10–31

Introduction of metal use         pp. 10–31

 

Basic features of early civilizations      pp. 15–31

Mesopotamia           pp. 18–20

Egypt       pp. 20, 22

Indus valley civilization           p. 22

Shang dynasty         p. 23

Mesoamerica and Andean South America              pp. 104–105

 

Classical civilizations            pp. 32–119

Major political developments  pp. 32–119

Social and gender structures    pp. 32–119

Major trading patterns             p. 54

Arts, sciences, and technology                pp. 45–52, 68–70, 87–90

 

Major belief systems             p. 111

Polytheism              pp. 2–31

Hinduism                pp. 56–75

Judaism   pp. 25–29

Confucianism          pp. 38–59

Daoism    pp. 38–59

Buddhism                pp. 56–75, 98, 117

Christianity              pp. 98–117, 210–233

 

Late Classical period (200 C.E.–600 C.E.)         pp. 98–125

Collapse of empires p. 100

Movements of peoples            p. 100

Interregional networks by 600 C.E.        p. 119

 

Unit 1 Assessment/Document Analysis Readings

  • Online-Primary & Secondary Source Document Analysis (Student/Class Discussion)
    • Students use internet and text sources to investigate the foundations of early history
  • Essay Writing (Thesis Paragraph/Paragraph Development, DBQ, Comp, and or CCOT)
    • Introduce Comparative-Comparative Case Studies
      • Document: Early Art: Religion and Worship?
      • Document: A Visitor from the Neolithic Age - The Iceman
    • Introduce CCOT-Text Book Page 4-7 and 34-37
    • Introduce DBQ-interpret and analyze primary and secondary source documents
      • Document: Darius the Great: Ruler of Persia
      • Document: Sima Qian on Qin Shihuang
    • In-depth Reading and Analysis
      • Ch1 Document: Hammurabi’s Law Code
      • Ch2 In Depth: Women in Patriarchal Societies
      • Ch3 In Depth: Inequality as the Social Norm
      • Ch4 Document: Rome and a Values Crisis
      • Ch5 Document: The Popularization of Buddhism
  • Unit/Chapter Multiple Choice Test
    • Pre, Post, Chapter Final Test Ch1-5 [DBQ Practice Essay] September

 

18.5 Days: Unit 2 Organization and Reorganization of Human Societies, c. 600 B.C.E. to c. 600 C.E., Chapters 6–15

 

Questions of periodization   pp. 120–125

Nature and causes of changes pp. 120–125

Emergence of new empires     pp. 120–125

Continuities and breaks with the period  pp. 126–171

 

The Islamic world pp. 126–149

The rise and role of Islam        pp. 126–149

Islamic political structures       pp. 126–149

Arts, sciences, and technologies              pp. 126–149

 

Interregional networks and contacts  p. 125

Trade, technology, and cultural exchange                pp. 150–171

—Trans-Sahara trade              pp. 172–193

—Indian Ocean trade              pp. 150–171

—Silk routes           pp. 150–171

Missionary outreach of major religions   p. 123

Contacts between major religions            pp. 111–117

Impact of Mongol empires      pp. 302–323

 

China's internal and external expansion            pp. 256–277

Tang and Song economic revolutions     pp. 256–277

Chinese influence on surrounding areas  pp. 278–301

Arts, sciences, and technologies              pp. 256–301

 

Developments in Europe      pp. 194–233

Restructuring of European institutions    pp. 154–233

The division of Christendom   pp. 154–209

Patterns in the Amerindian world      pp. 234–255

Maya       p. 236      Aztec       pp. 237–238            Inca         pp. 244–246

 

Demographic and environmental changes         pp. 302–323

Impact of nomadic migrations p. 318

Consequences of plague pandemics in the 14th century          pp. 302–323, 340–341

Growth and role of cities         p. 329

 

Unit 2 Assessment/Readings

  • Online-Primary & Secondary Source Analysis (Student/Class Discussion)
    • Students use internet and text sources to investigate
  • Unit/Chapter Outline (Map, Web, Graphic Organizer)
    •  
  • Essay Writing (Thesis Paragraph/Paragraph Development, DBQ, Comp, and or CCOT)
    • Comparative Case Studies
      • Ch 13 In Depth: Comparing Feudalisms

 

  • CCOT-Text Book Page 122-125
  • DBQ-interpret and analyze primary and secondary source documents
    • Ch6 Document: The Thousand and One Nights as a Mirror of Elite Society in the Abbasid Era
    • Ch7 Document: Ibn Khaldun on the Rise and Decline of Empires
  • In-depth Reading and Analysis
  • Ch8 In Depth: Two Transitions in the History of World Population
  • Ch9 In Depth: Eastern and Western Europe: The Problem of Boundaries
  • Ch10 Document: Changing Roles for Women
  • Ch11 Document: Aztec Women and Men
  • Ch12 Document: Ties That Bind: Paths to Power
  • Ch14 Document: A European Assessment of the Virtues and Vices of the Mongols
  • Ch15 In Depth: The Problem of Ethnocentrism
  • Unit/Chapter Multiple Choice Test
    • Pre, Post, Chapter Final Test Chapter 6-15 [CCOT Practice Essay] November

 

24 Days: Unit 3: Regional and Trans-regional Interactions, c. 600 C.E. to c. 1450, Chapters 16–22

 

Questions of periodization   pp. 342–347

Continuities and breaks           pp. 342–347

 

Changes in trade, technology, and global interactions     pp. 348–367

The Columbian Exchange       pp. 342–367

Impact of guns        pp. 348–367

Changes in shipbuilding          pp. 348–367

New navigational devices        pp. 345–367

 

Major empires, other political units, and social systems   pp. 456–481

Ottoman  pp. 482–503

China       pp. 482–503

Portugal   pp. 348–367

Spain       pp. 348–367

Russia     pp. 388–403

France     pp. 348–387

England   pp. 348–387

Tokugawa               pp. 482–503

Mughal    pp. 456–481

Benin       pp. 432–455

Songhay  pp. 432–455

 

Gender and empire               pp. 348–367

Slave systems and slave trade              pp. 432–455

Demographic and environmental changes         pp. 504–505

 

Cultural and intellectual developments              pp. 368–387

Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment pp. 368–387

Changes and continuities in Confucianism              pp. 482–503

Major developments in the arts               pp. 368–387

 

Unit 3 Assessment/Reading

  • Online-Primary & Secondary Source Analysis (Student/Class Discussion)
    • Students use internet and text sources to investigate
  • Unit/Chapter Outline (Map, Web, Graphic Organizer)
    •  
  • Essay Writing (Thesis Paragraph/Paragraph Development, DBQ, Comp, and or CCOT)
    • Comparative Case Studies
      • Document: Galileo Galilei, Letter to the Grand Duchess Christina
      • Document: Nicolaus Copernicus: On the Revolution of the Heavenly Spheres
      • Ch22 In Depth: Means and Motives for Overseas Expansion: Europe and China Compared
    • CCOT-Text Book Page 342-347
    • DBQ-interpret and analyze primary and secondary source documents
      • Ch17 Document: Controversies About Women
      • Ch20 Document: An African’s Description of the Middle Passage
      •  
    • In-depth Reading and Analysis
      • Ch16 In Depth: Causation and the West’s Expansion
      • Ch18 In Depth: Multinational Empires
      • Ch19 In Depth: The Great Exchange
      • Ch21 In Depth: The Gunpowder Empires and the Shifting Balance of Global Power
  • Unit/Chapter Multiple Choice Test
    • Pre, Post, Chapter Final Test Ch 16-22 [Comparative Practice Essay] January

 

 

24 Days: Unit 4: Global Interactions, c. 1450 to c. 1750, Chapters 23–27

 

Questions of periodization   pp. 506–511

Continuities and breaks           pp. 506–511

 

Global commerce, communications, and technology         pp. 506–511, 634–635

Changes in world trade           pp. 538–561

Industrial Revolution               pp. 506–537, 614–633

 

Demographic and environmental changes         pp. 506–511, 634–637

Changes in social and gender structure             pp. 512–538

Political revolutions and independence movements          pp. 513–515

Latin American independence movements              pp. 562–589

Revolutions             pp. 513–520

Rise of nationalism and nation-states      pp. 521–523, 564–568

Overlaps between nations and empires   p. 590

Rise of democracy and its limitations      pp. 513–533

Patterns of cultural interactions among societies               pp. 634–635

 

Unit 4 Assessment/Reading

  • Online-Primary & Secondary Source Analysis (Student/Class Discussion)
    • Students use internet and text sources to investigate
  • Unit/Chapter Outline (Map, Web, Graphic Organizer)
    •  
  • Essay Writing (Thesis Paragraph/Paragraph Development, DBQ, Comp, and or CCOT)
    • Introduce Comparative Case Studies
      • Document: The Declaration of Independence
      • Document: The Seneca Falls Convention
    • Introduce CCOT-Text Book Page 506-511
    • Introduce DBQ-interpret and analyze primary and secondary source documents
      • Ch 23 Document: Women in the Industrial Revolution
      • Ch 25 Document: Confronting the Hispanic Heritage: From Independence to Consolidation
      • Ch 26 Document: Building a New China
      • Ch 27 Document: Conditions for Factory Workers in Russia’s Industrialization
      • Ch27 Visualizing the Past: Two Faces of Western Influence
      • Ch 25 Visualizing the Past: Images of the Spanish American War
      • Ch 24 Visualizing the Past: Capitalism and Colonialism
    • In-depth Reading and Analysis
      • Ch 24 Document: Contrary Images: The Colonizer Versus the Colonized on the “Civilizing Mission”
      • Ch 25 In Depth: Explaining Underdevelopment
      • Ch 26 In Depth: Western Dominance and the Decline of Civilizations
      • Ch 27 In Depth: The Separate Paths of Japan and China
  • Unit/Chapter Multiple Choice Test
    • Pre, Post, Chapter Final Test 23-27 [DBQ & CCOT Practice Essay] March

 

24 Days: Unit 5: Industrialization and Global Integration, c. 1750 to c. 1900– Chapters 28–36

24 Days: Unit 6: Accelerating Global Change and Realignments, c. 1900 to Present– Chapters 28–36

 

Questions of periodization   pp. 636–643

Continuities and breaks           pp. 644–668, 706–731

 

The World Wars, the Holocaust, and the Cold War         pp. 644–668, 706–731

International organizations and their impact    p. 720

New patterns of nationalism                p. 735

 

Impact of major global economic developments                pp. 690–693

Great Depression    pp. 860–875

Technology             pp. 821–829

Pacific Rim              pp. 821–829

Multinational corporations      pp. 861–865

 

New forces of revolution and other political innovations  pp. 679–891

Social reform and social revolution     pp. 810–820, 830–834

Globalization of science, technology, and culture              pp. 560–579

 

Global cultures and regional reactions               pp. 560–579

Elite, popular culture, and art   pp. 560–579

Patterns of resistance               pp. 560–579

Demographic and environmental changes               pp. 871–873

 

Unit 5 Assessment/Reading

  • Online-Primary & Secondary Source Analysis (Student/Class Discussion)
    • Students use internet and text sources to investigate
  • Unit/Chapter Outline (Map, Web, Graphic Organizer)
    •  
  • Essay Writing (Thesis Paragraph/Paragraph Development, DBQ, Comp, and or CCOT)
    • Introduce Comparative Case Studies
      • Ch 28 Document: Stalin Demands Rapid Industrialization of the USSR
      • Ch 28 Document: The Six Arrows of Kemalism: The Principles of the Republican People's Party (RPP), 1935
      • Ch 33 Visualizing the Past: Globalization and Postcolonial Societies
      • Ch 36 Visualizing the Past: Two Faces of Globalization
    • Introduce CCOT-Text Book Page 636-643
    • Introduce DBQ-interpret and analyze primary and secondary source documents
      • Ch 29 Document: Socialist Realism
      • Ch 30 Document: Japan and the Loss of World War II
      • Ch 31 Document: 1986: A New Wave of Soviet Reform
      • Ch 34 Document: Women in the Revolutionary Struggle
      • Ch 35 Document: Democratic Protest and Repression in China
      • Ch 36 Document: Protests Against Globalization
    • In-depth Reading and Analysis (Students use internet and text sources to investigate)
      • Ch 28 In Depth: Women in Asian and African Nationalist Movements
      • Ch 32 In Depth: Human Rights in the 20th Century
      • Ch 33 In Depth: Artificial Nations and the Rising Tide of Communal Strife
      • Ch 35 In Depth: Terrorism, Then and Now
  • Unit/Chapter Multiple Choice Test
    • Pre, Post, Chapter Final Test Ch28-36 [Comparative Practice Essay]  April

 

 

AP World History Teachers Guide (Mr. Noel is on page 35)

http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/members/repository/ap07_worldhist_teachersguide.pdf

 

 

Appendix

**********Essential/Entry Point Question (Student/Class Discussion)********

Socratic Discussion Question Analysis

 

  • 6.5 Days: Unit 1: Technological and Environmental Transformations, to c. 600 B.C.E., Chapters 1–5

Essential Question: How might geography influence the development of human settlements?

ENTRY POINTS (Focus Questions):

  1. How might geography affect the location and development of trade and growth of cities?
  2. What criteria could be used to determine that a society was civilized?  Could you apply those criteria to other societies?
  3. How might a society's religion influence the relations between different groups of people?
  4. What might cause differences in women's conditions in patriarchal societies?

 

Essential Question: How did the Neolithic agrarian revolution transform the material life and social organization of human communities to form civilizations?

ENTRY POINTS:

  1. Where were the first sedentary agricultural communities established?  How are the first sites connected to the spread of sedentary agriculture?
  2. In what ways was Harappan civilization like Mesopotamian civilization?
  3. What was the nature of the political organization of Shang China
  4. How is the caste system compared to other systems of social inequality devised by early and classical civilizations, including slavery

 

Essential Question: How does the percentage of the earth inhabited by civilization compare to that for migratory societies?

What is the reason for the difference?

ENTRY POINTS (Focus Questions):

  1. What are the types of pastoral nomadism and where are they located geographically?  What were the roles of nomadic groups in the collapse of empires?
  2. What were the political, social, and economic consequences of the period of the Warring States?
  3. How does Greek civilization compare and contrast to other civilizations?
  4. How and why the collapse of empire was more severe in Western Europe than it was in the eastern Mediterranean or in China?
  5. How does the development of political systems in major early civilizations, e.g., Indian compared with Chinese political traditions and institutions; caliphate with Roman Empire?

 

Essential Question: How did the territorial expansion of the republic affect the society and politics of Rome?

ENTRY POINTS (Focus Questions):

  1.  Compare and contrast Greek civilization to Roman civilization.
  2. To what extent did Rome innovate in Mediterranean civilization?
  3. Why did Christianity spread within the Roman Empire?
  4. What was the legacy of the Roman Empire to successor western civilizations?

 

Essential Question: What defines the end of a historical period and the beginning of a new period? How does the end of the classical period fit this definition?

ENTRY POINTS (Focus Questions):

  1. How were all of the fringe societies similar? To what extent were they different?
  2. When did sedentary agricultural societies emerge in the Americas? What were the staples of American agriculture? How did sedentary agriculture affect social and political organization?
  3. Compare and contrast the political and religious organization of the Gupta Empire with the Maurya Empire.
  4. What are the causes of the decline and fall of the Roman Empire?
  5. Compare and contrast Buddhism and Christianity.

 

Essential Question: How might geography influence the development of human settlements?

ENTRY POINTS (Focus Questions):

  1. How might geography affect the location and development of trade and growth of cities?
  2. What criteria could be used to determine that a society was civilized?  Could you apply those criteria to other societies?
  3. How might a society's religion influence the relations between different groups of people?
  4. What might cause differences in women's conditions in patriarchal societies?

 

Essential Question: How did the Neolithic agrarian revolution transform the material life and social organization of human communities to form civilizations?

ENTRY POINTS:

  1. Where were the first sedentary agricultural communities established?  How are the first sites connected to the spread of sedentary agriculture?
  2. In what ways was Harappan civilization like Mesopotamian civilization?
  3. What was the nature of the political organization of Shang China
  4. How is the caste system compared to other systems of social inequality devised by early and classical civilizations, including slavery

 

 

 

 

 

 

Essential Question: How does the percentage of the earth inhabited by civilization compare to that for migratory societies?

What is the reason for the difference?

ENTRY POINTS (Focus Questions):

  1. What are the types of pastoral nomadism and where are they located geographically?  What were the roles of nomadic groups in the collapse of empires?
  2. What were the political, social, and economic consequences of the period of the Warring States?
  3. How does Greek civilization compare and contrast to other civilizations?
  4. How and why the collapse of empire was more severe in Western Europe than it was in the eastern Mediterranean or in China?
  5. How does the development of political systems in major early civilizations, e.g., Indian compared with Chinese political traditions and institutions; caliphate with Roman Empire?

 

Essential Question: How did the territorial expansion of the republic affect the society and politics of Rome?

ENTRY POINTS (Focus Questions):

  1.  Compare and contrast Greek civilization to Roman civilization.
  2. To what extent did Rome innovate in Mediterranean civilization?
  3. Why did Christianity spread within the Roman Empire?
  4. What was the legacy of the Roman Empire to successor western civilizations?

 

Essential Question: What defines the end of a historical period and the beginning of a new period? How does the end of the classical period fit this definition?

ENTRY POINTS (Focus Questions):

  1. How were all of the fringe societies similar? To what extent were they different?
  2. When did sedentary agricultural societies emerge in the Americas? What were the staples of American agriculture? How did sedentary agriculture affect social and political organization?
  3. Compare and contrast the political and religious organization of the Gupta Empire with the Maurya Empire.
  4. What are the causes of the decline and fall of the Roman Empire?
  5. Compare and contrast Buddhism and Christianity.

 

 

Ø18.5 Days Unit 2: Organization and Reorganization of Human Societies, c. 600 B.C.E. to c. 600 C.E., Chapters 6–15

Essential Question:  Compare and contrast the status of women in Islam during the pre-Islamic period and the Abbasid Empire.

ENTRY POINTS (Focus Questions):

  1. Why was Islam able to appeal to people of so many different cultures?
  2. What was the essential dispute within Islam over the succession to the Prophet?
  3. What was the difference between the Abbasid Empire and the Umayyad Empire?
  4. Describe the social organization of the Arabs prior to the introduction of Islam.

 

Essential Question:  Compare and contrast the initial spread of Islam throughout the Mediterranean and the Middle East with the

Islamic incursions into India and Southeast Asia.  For example, who were the primary conquerors?

ENTRY POINTS (Focus Questions):

  1. In what sense did the Muslim incursions into the Indian subcontinent result in Islamic influences on Hindus?

To what extent were Muslims affected by Indian culture?

  1. Explain the reasons for the political disruption of the Abbasid Empire prior to the rise of the Buyids.
  2. By what means did Islam spread to Southeast Asia?
  3. Describe the general economy of the later Abbasid Empire.

Include a comparative evaluation of urban and rural economies.

 

Essential Question:  Compare and contrast the Islamic impact on India and Southeast Asia with the religion’s affect on sub-Saharan Africa.

ENTRY POINTS (Focus Questions):

  1. What were the common elements of African society prior to the incursion of Islam?
  2. By what means was conversion of sub-Saharan Africa carried out? What were the primary avenues of Islamic entry into

sub-Saharan Africa?

  1. Islamic influence was strongest in the Sudanic states and the Swahili coast. Compare and contrast the political forms of these regions? What does this suggest about the nature of Islamic influence in Africa?
  2. Compare and contrast the political forms of the African states not affected by Islam (Yoruba, Benin, Kongo, Zimbabwe) with those that were (the Sudanic states and the Swahili coast).
  3. Given the geographical location of those African states most affected by Islam, what were the most important points of contact between African and Islamic societies? What does this suggest about the nature of Islamic conversion?

 

Essential Question:  What was the essential nature of Byzantine political organization and culture?  How did it affect the development of Eastern Europe?

ENTRY POINTS (Focus Questions):

1.  Compare and contrast the spread of European civilization in eastern and western Europe.

2.  What was the political organization of the Byzantine Empire?

3.  What were the factors in the decline of the Byzantine Empire?

4.  In what ways was the culture of Kievan Russia an extension of the Byzantine Empire?

 

 

 

 

 

Essential Question:  Compare and contrast the medieval West from 1000 to 1500 with Islamic civilization during the same period.

ENTRY POINTS (Focus Questions):

1.  What were the positive signs of vitality associated with the Middle Ages?

2.  Define manorialism and feudalism. How do they provide the building blocks for medieval political structure and society?

3.  How did the theological outlook of western Europe change between 1000 and 1400?

4.  What were the developments that led to increases in monarchic power at the end of the Middle Ages?

How was royal authority limited?

 

Essential Question:  How were American societies different from European society?

ENTRY POINTS (Focus Questions):

1. What were the major civilizations of Pre-classic and Classic Mesoamerica? How were these civilizations organized socially, politically, economically?

2.  What were the bases for the organization of society among the Andes civilizations?

3.  In what ways did the Aztecs continue the culture of the classical Mesoamerican civilization and the Toltecs?

4.  Compare and contrast the Inca and Aztec empires in terms of political administration.

5.  How did the Indian cultures outside the Andean and Mesoamerican civilization zones contrast in political and social organization with the Aztec and Inca empires?

 

Essential Question:  How was East Asian civilization different form other postclassical civilizations in terms of cultural diffusion?

ENTRY POINTS (Focus Questions):

  1. What were the elements of Tang-Song economic prosperity?
  2. In what ways did the Chinese empire during the Tang-Song era depart from previous developments in Chinese civilization?
  3. How did the Japanese importation of Chinese culture differ from that of Vietnam and Korea?
  4. How did the extension of Chinese culture to its satellite civilizations differ from other global civilizations?

 

Essential Question:  How was the world in 1500 different than the world in 1250?

ENTRY POINTS (Focus Questions):

  1. Why did sedentary civilizations progressively dominate nomadic societies after the fifteenth century?
  2. Define the territorial extent of the Mongol empire at its largest. How did this affect inter-cultural exchange?
  3. What can be said to have been the positive aspects of the Mongol conquests?
  4. What were the sources of dynamism that fueled the Western advances relative to other civilizations?
  5. In what sense were the civilizations outside the world network of cultural exchange (the Americas, Africa, and Polynesia)  vulnerable to interaction with other civilizations?

 

  • 24 Days: Unit 3: Regional and Trans-regional Interactions, c. 600 C.E. to c. 1450, Chapters 16–22

Essential Question:  In what ways did the Renaissance, Reformation, and Enlightenment have an impact on the political organization of  Europe?

ENTRY POINTS

1.  In what ways was Western Europe in 1750 different from the medieval West?

2.  How would you contrast the Renaissance and the scientific revolution?

3.  In what ways did the commercial revolution of the sixteenth century change the social structure of the West?

4.  How was the absolute monarchy of the seventeenth century different from the political forms of the Middle Ages?

5.  How did the Enlightenment effect changes in popular outlook?

 

Essential Question:  In what ways did the creation of a global economy in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries differ from the

previous trade networks that had existed between civilizations (for example, the Islamic trade system)?

ENTRY POINTS

  1. Describe the early European exploration of the world. Characterize the nature of early settlement.
  2. What was the nature of the "Colombian Exchange"?
  3. The European expansion of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries created an imbalance in world trade.

Discuss the emergence of dominant core areas and peripheral dependent zones.

  1. Prior to 1600, what areas of the world remained outside the global trading network?

What areas were then incorporated into the network after 1600?

  1. Of all the colonial systems, the Atlantic colonies of North America most fully incorporated Western civilization.

In what ways were the Atlantic colonies similar to the West?  In what ways did they differ?

 

Essential Question:  In what ways the development of the Russian empire from 1480 to 1800 similar to the expansion of the West in the same period.  In what ways was it different?

ENTRY POINTS

  1. What was the nature of early Russian expansion under the Ivans?
  2. In what way did Peter the Great reform the economy and government of Russia through Westernization?
  3. In what ways were the policies of Westernization undertaken by Peter the Great and Catherine the Great more appearance than substance?
  4. What were the primary differences by the eighteenth century between Russia and the West?

 

Essential Question:  How was the social organization of the Americas different from that of Europe?

ENTRY POINTS

  1. In what sense can it be said that the nature of the Latin American colonies were simply a reflection of Iberian society?
  2. In what ways did the Spanish administration of their American colonies change from their initial establishment under Columbus to 1700?
  3. Compare and contrast the colonial economies of Spanish America and Brazil.
  4. How was the society of the Latin American colonies organized? What determined the social hierarchy?
  5. What was the intent of the Spanish reforms of the eighteenth century? To what extent were they successful?

 

Essential Question:  How was the Muslim decline related to the rise of the West?

ENTRY POINTS

  1. Discuss the social and political organization of the Ottoman empire.
  2. Compare and contrast the basic structure of the three Islamic empires.
  3. Compare and contrast the causes for decline and collapse in each of the Islamic early modern empire.
  4. How did the religious complexion of Mughal India differ from that of the other Islamic empires? What impact did religious diversity have on the Mughals?

 

Essential Question:  How did the slave trade affect African state formation?

ENTRY POINTS

  1. What model did the Portuguese establish for the exploitation of Africa?
  2. To what extent was slavery a feature of African society prior to the coming of the Europeans? How was it intertwined with the development of more centralized states?
  3. Evaluate the causes for the end of the Atlantic slave trade.

 

Essential Question:  How successful were European missionary efforts by the early 1600s?

ENTRY POINTS

  1. Define the characteristics of the Asian sea trading network. In what ways did the European incursion change the Asian system?
  2. What was the nature of the Ming restoration of traditional Chinese values? What innovations were made?
  3. Compare and contrast Chinese and European means and motives for commercial expansion.
  4. Following the establishment of the Tokugawa Shogunate, what was the nature of Japanese isolation?
  5. Evaluate the impact of the European entry into the Asian sea trading network.

 

Ø24 Days: Unit 4: Global Interactions, c. 1450 to c. 1750, Chapters 23–27

Essential Question:  How did the Industrial Revolution transform traditional ways of life?

ENTRY POINTS

  1. What were the permanent reforms of the American and French Revolutions?
  2. In what ways did the Napoleonic period, despite the creation of an authoritarian regime, result in the extension of revolution to the rest of Europe?
  3. What changes led to the Industrial Revolution in Britain? What social changes did the Industrial Revolution cause?
  4. How did the emergence of new central European nations after 1870 lead to increased diplomatic tensions?

 

Essential Question:  How did the Industrial Revolution transform traditional ways of life?

ENTRY POINTS

  1. In what ways was the British conquest of India similar to the Dutch colonization of Java? In what ways was it different?
  2. One of the first elements of European reform within the colonies was the introduction of educational systems.

In what sense did the introduction of Western education plant the seeds of decolonization?

  1. In what ways did the colonizers of the late nineteenth century control the indigenous peoples and increase economic exploitation?
  2. In what ways did the colonial experience of "contested settler colonies" differ from that of "tropical dependencies"?
  3. In terms of models of revolution available to Latin Americans in the early nineteenth century, which examples were considered acceptable, which unacceptable, and why?
  4. In what ways were the revolutionary movements in Mexico, northern South America, and southern South America similar?
  5. In what ways were the Latin American economies of the nineteenth century dependent on the industrialized nations of Europe and North America?
  6. What are the explanations offered for the relative "underdevelopment" of Latin America? Which explanation seems to be the most sufficient explanation?
  7. Discuss the relationship of the United States with Latin America until 1910.

 

Essential Question:  Compare and contrast the incursion of the European nations into the Islamic heartlands and China with their entry into African& Latan America.

ENTRY POINTS

  1. How did the emergence of the industrialized West affect the pattern for the decline of civilizations?
  2. How did the experience of the Qing dynasty in China and the Ottoman Empire differ between 1700 and 1900?
  3. Compare and contrast the conditions leading to the overthrow of the Ottoman Empire in 1908 and the Qing dynasty in 1912.
  4. Compare and contrast the British intervention in Egypt with their intervention in China.
  5. Contrast the reactions of the Islamic heartlands and China to the challenge of the West.

 

Essential Question:  How did Russia and Japan respond to the pattern of growing Western domination by attempting to reform their own societies?  How successful were attempts at reforms in each country?

ENTRY POINTS

  1. Compare and contrast Japanese and Russian society prior to industrialization.
  2. Compare and contrast the political reforms undertaken in Japan and Russia prior to and during industrialization.
  3. Compare and contrast industrialization in Japan and Russia.
  4. Why did revolution occur in Russia in consequence of industrialization, but not in Japan?
  5. Why did Japan rather than China assume leadership in Asia in the face of the challenge of the West?

 

 

 

 

 

Essential Question:  How do the authors define the nature of the world economy and political systems by 1914?

ENTRY POINTS

 

  1. In what ways did the industrialization change the social structure and political alignment of the West?
  2. Compare European imperialism in the initial period of expansion after 1450 to the colonial movement between 1750 and 1914.
  3. In what ways were the independent states of Latin America successful in shaking off the colonial past?
    1. In what ways were they still imprisoned in the pattern of colonization?
  4. Compare and contrast the incursion of the European nations into the Islamic Heartlands and China with their entry into Africa.
  5. How did Russia and Japan respond to the pattern of growing Western domination in attempting to reform their own societies?   How successful were attempts at reform in each country?

 

  • 24 Days: Unit 5: Industrialization and Global Integration, c. 1750 to c. 1900– Chapters 28–36
  • 24 Days: Unit 6: Accelerating Global Change and Realignments, c. 1900 to Present– Chapters 28–36

Essential Question:  In what ways did the period from 1914 to 1945 mark the end of the old world order?

ENTRY POINTS

  1. Discuss the aftermath of World War I and its effect on European society.
  2. How did World War I affect societies outside of Western Europe?
  3. How can the causes of the Great Depression be related to the settlement of World War I?
  4. In what ways did the settlement of World War II repudiate the Versailles treaties that ended World War I?  In what ways did the settlement affirm the concepts included in the Versailles treaties?
  5. Define "total war." How did the World Wars of the twentieth century demonstrate the application of "total war"?

 

ENTRY POINTS

  1. What was the relationship between the depression and political instability?
  2. Characterize the internal politics of Western Europe after World War II.
  3. How did the social structure of the west change in the period after World War II?

 

30,31 Essential Question:  How does the development of the Soviet Union during the twentieth century compare to that of the West?  Consider industrial development, political development, and imperialism.

ENTRY POINTS

  1. What are the characteristics of twentieth century revolutions?
  2. In what ways did Stalinism alter the original concepts of Soviet economy and government?
  3. In what ways did the cultural policies of the Stalin regime depart from traditional Russian practices? In what ways did it emphasize them?
  4. How did the failures of the Soviet economy lead, in part, to the changes in Soviet policy after 1985?

 

30,31 Essential QuestionHow did the end of World War II impact the states of the Pacific Rim?

ENTRY POINTS

  1. Compare and contrast Japanese political organization before and after World War II.
  2. Compare and contrast the political structures of the Pacific Rim.
  3. In what ways are Japanese industrial culture and society different from the West?
  4. How did the relationship between the U.S. and the nations of the Pacific Rim change between 1945 and 1990?

 

32,33Essential Question:  How "revolutionary" has change been in the Latin American economy and society since 1910?

ENTRY POINTS

1.  Compare and contrast the Mexican Revolution of 1910 with the Cuban revolution of the 1950s.

2.  Define populism.  How have populist politics had a role in Latin America?

3.  Compare and contrast the radical revolutions of the 1950s in Cuba and Guatemala.

4.  How have population movements affected the development of Latin America in the 20th century?

5.  Discuss the role of the military in Latin American political development during the late twentieth century.

 

32,33 Essential Question:  How did the World Wars of the twentieth century weaken the hold of the European colonial powers on their empires?

ENTRY POINTS

1.  What were the limits of the decolonization movement of the twentieth century?

2.  In what ways were changes in women's status in colonies related to the decolonization movement?

3.  In what ways did the Indian independence movement provide a model for other decolonization movements?

4.  What were the common elements of all decolonization movements in South Asia, Middle East, and Africa?  What were the  

      primary differences?

5.  Contrast the African liberation movements in non-settler colonies with those with substantial white settler populations.

 

32,33 Essential Question:  How have women fared in the newly independent nations of the third world?

ENTRY POINTS

1.  What problems tend to be typical of all third world nations?

2.  To what extent were Third World problems the creation of imperialism?  To what extent were they indigenous?

3.  Compare and contrast the post-colonial governments of India and Egypt.

4.  In what sense was the Iranian revolution of 1979 a throwback to the fundamentalist revolts of the nineteenth century?

5.  In what sense has the process of decolonization been a positive movement?

 

C34Essential Question:  What experiences did China and Vietnam share with the rest of the World?  What experiences were unique to these nations?

ENTRY POINTS

1.  Discuss similarities in the preconditions of revolution in China and Vietnam.

2.  How did Mao's interpretation of Marx differ from that of Lenin? How did the difference affect the construction of the Chinese state?

3.  In what ways did Mao's concept of a peasant revolution lead to specific shifts in domestic policy during his rule?

4.  In what ways have the Communist regimes of Vietnam and China retained ties to the traditional cultures of the region?

5,  How did the experience of decolonization in Vietnam differ from that of most third world nations?

 

C35, Essential Question:  How can the changes of the last 100 years best be described?

ENTRY POINTS

1.  In what sense can it be said that the twentieth century represents a new period in world civilizations?

2.  What trends in political organization and economic development can be identified in twentieth century world civilizations?

3.  In what ways has the twentieth century offered evidence of human progress?  In what ways has humanity regressed?

4.  The authors postulate several potential causal factors impacting civilization in the future, including population growth, the exhaustion of frontiers, and technological advances associated with the "postindustrial world."  Evaluate the impact such factors are likely to have on the future.

5.  Consider the role of civilization identity versus the pace of internationalization in twentieth century cultures.213